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danaliza
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Registered: Jan 2003
Local time: 10:45 AM
Location: San Joser, CA
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The Teaching Job-Market post #1  quote:



Here?s an article from Education Week about the teaching job-market.

A New Market

The teacher job-market news has been pretty grim lately. With many states looking to close gaping budget deficits, schools districts across the country are facing cutbacks. Word of planned teacher layoffs in a number of districts has seeped into the headlines.

Yet a number of converse patterns are also apparent. Many districts are scrambling to hire more "highly qualified" teachers to meet a new federal mandate. Demographic data still suggest a growing need for qualified teachers in many areas. And, most interestingly, there are reports of aggressive recruiting efforts taking place even as pink slip notices go out.

It seems clear that the teacher job market hasn't tanked. It's just become more selective. Here are some ways, based on recent interviews and reports, you can help your chances.

* Get credentialed. The federal "No Child Left Behind" Act requires schools to have a fully licensed teacher in virtually every classroom by 2005. As a result, according to EDUCATION WEEK, school administrators have put "unprecedented energy" into seeking out fully certified teachers. (Alternative certification also counts under the law.) Many districts now also have programs to help teachers improve their credentials.

* Consider a shortage subject. Schools have been reporting an ongoing? and in some cases, critical?need for teachers in select subject areas: math, science, bilingual education, foreign languages, and special education. A school administrator in one cash-strapped district recently told us that cutbacks would in no way affect their pursuit of teachers in these subject areas. The need is just too great, she said.

* Consider an urban or rural school. A number of recent reports have highlighted the uneven distribution of qualified teachers throughout the country. Suburban schools are glutted, while inner-city and rural schools strain to fill their rosters. This "maldistribution" is becoming a focus of education policy. Even with tightened budgets, some districts can tap special grants to offer incentives to teachers who will work in high-needs schools.

* Get your foot in the door. Make the most of "pre-teaching" jobs. Anecdotal evidence at least suggests that teachers who shine as student teachers or substitutes give themselves the best chance of being pulled into a permanent job. In tough times, schools often view these jobs as way stations.

* Focus on students. In interviews or contacts with administrators, exhibit strong enthusiasm and consideration for students. It may separate you from the pack. A California principal recently told us, "I am looking for that optimist who feels any child not only can succeed but will succeed."

* Take the lead. In these times of heightened pressure and change, schools and recruiters are reportedly targeting candidates with strong "leadership skills." This means people who can solve problems, drive improvement, and build teams. Highlight these characteristics in your job-search materials.

?Anthony Rebora
Senior Online Editor
arebora@epe.org


Old Post 06-13-2003 05:12 PM
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claudiak
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post #2  quote:

Hopefully this suggestion isn't too mundane.

I work for a large non profit corporation in Human resources. All applications and resumes come to me for review, and I pass them on to managers that have openings in their department.

When I receive a resume that is full of typos, spelling errors, and poor grammar, it's very hard for me to pass in on. People - use your spell checkers!!

And, do not list every job you have ever had for 20 years. Lots of jobs make you look unstable and a job-hopper.

Oh, and I really do not care what your hobbies and interests are. Leave those off unless they are relevant to the position you are seeking.

Thanks!


Old Post 06-16-2003 05:41 PM
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bitwiz44
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Cool post #3  quote:

quote:
Originally posted by claudiak
Hopefully this suggestion isn't too mundane.

I work for a large non profit corporation in Human resources. All applications and resumes come to me for review, and I pass them on to managers that have openings in their department.

When I receive a resume that is full of typos, spelling errors, and poor grammar, it's very hard for me to pass in on. People - use your spell checkers!!

And, do not list every job you have ever had for 20 years. Lots of jobs make you look unstable and a job-hopper.

Oh, and I really do not care what your hobbies and interests are. Leave those off unless they are relevant to the position you are seeking.

Thanks!


And might i add...I got more out of the cover letter than the resume itself when looking for a candidate. My turn offs was 'Head hunters" packing way too much in a resume. You had three minutes to get my attention. I could listen to a head hunter...but reading...well head hunters want "you" to sell you...when they are suppose to sell you..thats what they get payed for. Now that i think about it....If a head hunter discussed the candidate at length to me..(like they did their job).I set an interview and did not even look at the resume untill I had the candidate in front of me. If the resume has too much...it leaves no room for questions in the interveiw.

The worst thing that can happen is a personell manager asking questions from a list. Unless your a mind reader...You will not have the answer to the question the have.

Candidates need to know the laws regarding what can be asked too.


Old Post 06-16-2003 08:33 PM
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claudiak
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post #4  quote:

I agree.

Many companies ask illegal questions when interviewing prospective candidates. Look at the employment laws for your state. And by all means, if you have a disability, disclose it !
California employers are required by law to make reasonable accomodations for your disability unless they are related to illegal drug use or sexual disorders. Federal guidelines for reasonable accomodations are less strict than California guidelines. The law provides severe penalities if an employer discrimates against you because of a disability.


Old Post 06-16-2003 09:43 PM
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Edward Teach
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post #5  quote:

Ok so here's a question. How far back do you go on Employment History and as far as a technical position what is too much information.

Take for instance a computer tech/administrator, do they care about the different pieces of software The different aspects of the job etc. Do they want to see Bullet Statements or a short paragraph?

And expand more on the cover letter aspect. When did the cover letter become so important?

Man it's hard to keep up with what HR folks are looking for.


Old Post 11-16-2004 06:31 AM
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esskay
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post #6  quote:

You can see my resume if you like. I did the whole thing myself and have evolved it considerably over the years.

I INSIST on including the small passage about my personal interests at the bottom because I refuse to work for anyone who doesn't give a crap about who I am and what I'm all about, as claudiak appears to be. If I get dropped off a stack for that alone, so be it, but I can't tell you how many ice-breaker conversations I've had in interviews that small passage gave rise to.

This resume is structured to present all of my technical abilities on the first page (some resume scanners never look past the first page. If they have to dig at all to get what they're after, they won't bother because they've got hundreds of other candidates that properly feed them this type of information plain & clear). The work history is restricted to only the most relevant positions for the given job. This particular version of my resume is aimed at web software & database systems. Note the last line of the work experience section identifies that indeed I had other jobs, but that they have not been identified on this particular copy.

Language is also carefully selected on my resume to pack as much information as possible into as small a space as I can manage and still maintain grammatical effectiveness.

Some of these tricks I learned from hiring technical staff at the last job listed there. The resume is actually out of date as I've started a new company and have had another regular employer since the last one there. For the most recent job, I was brought in for an interview and they said, "we don't really have any questions, your resume speaks for itself - how much are you looking for?"


Old Post 11-23-2004 12:21 AM
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esskay
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post #7  quote:

It's action packed and targeted towards what recruiters in that industry are looking for. It would indeed be "too busy" if I were applying for a customer service position at Walmart, but not for this

Old Post 11-23-2004 12:50 AM
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Edward Teach
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post #8  quote:

Looks great and gives me some good ideas. One thing that an HR person told me is that the resume should have just enough to get them to call you in for an interview. If the resume has it all then there is no need to bring you in.

Old Post 11-23-2004 01:13 AM
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